courses:calculus_i:spring_2011:assignments

Assignments

Homework

Your homework is to do as many problems as you need to do to master all of the material we are learning.

Different students will have different areas that they need to concentrate on. I will provide a list of suggested problems that cover the material we are learning, as well as additional problems you can do for further practice. I highly recommend that you do the suggested problems. After you have done the suggested problems, it is up to you to choose the problems in the areas that you need to work on the most to learn the material.

Do a minimum of 5 problems per class day on average (i.e., 15 problems per week).

After you have finished the minimum 15 problems, continue to choose and do problems until you have mastered the material. I suggest that you do these problems early in the unit, so that you can resolve questions early and spend your time later in the unit on your lesson plans and corrections. Students who wait until the end of the unit to do homework often do not realize they have questions until it is too late to resolve them before the quiz.

Here are some suggestions for doing homework:

  • Pick problems that challenge you and help you learn areas that you have not mastered yet. If you understand completely how to do a certain type of problem, do one or two just to make sure, then move on. Spend your time on problems that will stretch you.
  • If a problem is taking you 15-20 minutes, and you still haven't solved it, that's okay. Take a break and work on a different problem. Let your subconscious mind work on the hard problem, and come back to it, maybe the next day (one reason to start the hard problems early!). If you still are having trouble after another 15-20 minutes, come talk with me. While challenging problems take time to think about and absorb, don't spend so much of your time on a single problem that you have no time for anything else. Often a quick chat with me will clear up a misunderstanding and the problem will seem much easier.
  • Use technology to help speed up the process for mundane computations that you already know how to do by hand. Do not use technology as a crutch to do computations that you don't know how to do by hand.

What counts as a "homework problem"?

A problem counts as a “homework problem” if you have worked through and written up a correct solution on your own (and you understand it!). For example, these count as “doing” a homework problem:

  • working through a problem and writing up your correct solution to a suggested homework problem
  • working through an example from the text on your own and writing up your correct solution
  • working together in a group on a problem, and then you personally, by yourself, writing up your correct solution

Here are some examples which do not count as doing a homework problem:

  • reading through an example from a book, or reading through someone else's solutions to a problem
  • copying work from someone else, or writing down what they say
  • working through a problem in a group, but then not writing up the solution on your own in your own words
  • an incorrect solution to a problem
  • a quiz or test problem (including corrections or technology assignments), or a problem for which you get credit in other ways

Other assignments

From time to time, we will also have other assignments that will be announced in class.

Unless explicitly allowed, assignments and quizzes are due at the beginning of class on the day they are due.

Homework Problem List

Here is a list of homework problems that target the material we are covering. I suggest that you know how to do these sorts of problems.

Limits

2.1 7, 9
2.2 1, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 31
2.3 9, 27, 31, 33, 37, 39, 43, 53, 57 59, 67, 75, 122
2.4 3, 5, 9, 17, 19, 47, 69, 93, 107
2.5 1, 2, 19, 49, 55, 69

Derivatives

I suggest that in sections 3.2 and 3.3, you do more than the minimum 5 problems per class period so that you are practiced at calculating derivatives. Being able to quickly and easily calculate derivatives will allow you to concentrate better on the applications of derivatives in the following units.

3.1 17, 39–42, 45–48, 57, 59, 85, 97, 102, 104
3.2 3–26, 33–40, 41–56, 61, 65, 69, 71, 93, 114
3.3 1–12, 25–56, 73, 77, 87, 95–106, 113, 117, 131

Chain Rule

Problem ranges marked with a star indicate that you should be comfortable doing any of them. Do enough practice so that you are comfortable using the chain rule to compute first and second derivatives and could do any of the problems indicated. You do not need to do every single one of the starred problems.

3.4 9–38*, 57–106*, 107–114*, 131–146*, 55, 149, 161, 171
3.5 1–22*, 23, 27–36*, 45, 57, 71–82*
3.6 1–8*, 9, 17, 19, 21–38*, 47, 59, 67, 68, 69
3.7 1–8*, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29, 33, 42, 49

Optimization

3.8 1, 5, 11, 27, 29
4.1 1, 5, 25, 41, 43, 65, 71
4.3 5, 25, 37, 41, 57, 61, 78, 101
4.4 15, 21, 35, 47, 51, 57, 61, 77, 78
4.7 21, 25, 39, 43, 44, 49, 58

Understanding Functions

4.2 13, 15, 21, 45, 47, 67, 69, 73
4.5 17, 27, 33, 35, 39, 95
4.6 15, 28, 37, 55, 59
4.8 11, 17, 31, 35, 37, 38, 39

Integration

Problem ranges marked with a star indicate that you should be comfortable doing any of them. Do enough practice so that you are comfortable and could do any of the problems indicated. You do not need to do every single one of the starred problems.

5.2 7, 9, 41, 49, 61, 75
5.6 13, 21, 23
5.3 15-22*, 39, 41
5.1 15-44*
5.4 9, 29, 37, 51, 55, 72, 85-92*, 115
5.5 11, 27, 51, 57, 61, 81, 107, 115 (you should be able to do any problem from 11-38*, 49-82*, 99-116*), 139, 141, 151

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